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Environmental Science and Protection Technician

Overview and Key Facts

Environmental scientists sampling contaminated water in field
Education
Education
Associate's degree
Median Pay
Median Pay
$47,370
Job Growth
Job Growth
5.90%
(Above US Average)
Jobs in 2031
Jobs in 2031
37,600

What Do They Do?

An environmental science and protection technician could...

Overview Listen to this section

Pollution affects everything the eye can see (and even places your eyes cannot see, like deep underground and air particles). This is when environmental science and protection technicians, or an environmental advisor, come to the rescue! They help identify issues caused from pollution or contamination. They may collect samples and test them. They can even plan emergency responses and recommend improvements to make the world a better place for all!

Do You Have the Skills and Characteristics of an Environmental Science and Protection Technician?


  1. Active Listening: ?
  2. Reading Comprehension: ?
  3. Critical Thinking: ?
  4. Speaking: ?
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Core Tasks

Think about if you'd like the typical tasks an Environmental Science and Protection Technician might do:
  • Discuss test results and analyses with customers.
  • Record test data and prepare reports, summaries, or charts that interpret test results.
  • Develop or implement programs for monitoring of environmental pollution or radiation.
  • Investigate hazardous conditions or spills or outbreaks of disease or food poisoning, collecting samples for analysis.
  • Calibrate microscopes or test instruments.
  • Provide information or technical or program assistance to government representatives, employers, or the general public on the issues of public health, environmental protection, or workplace safety.
  • Collect samples of gases, soils, water, industrial wastewater, or asbestos products to conduct tests on pollutant levels or identify sources of pollution.
  • Monitor emission control devices to ensure they are operating properly and comply with state and federal regulations.
  • Inspect sanitary conditions at public facilities.
  • Examine and analyze material for presence and concentration of contaminants, such as asbestos, using variety of microscopes.
  • Inspect workplaces to ensure the absence of health and safety hazards, such as high noise levels, radiation, or potential lighting hazards.
  • Develop or implement site recycling or hazardous waste stream programs.
  • Analyze potential environmental impacts of production process changes, and recommend steps to mitigate negative impacts.
  • Perform statistical analysis of environmental data.
  • Set up equipment or stations to monitor and collect pollutants from sites, such as smoke stacks, manufacturing plants, or mechanical equipment.
  • Make recommendations to control or eliminate unsafe conditions at workplaces or public facilities.
  • Distribute permits, closure plans, or cleanup plans.
  • Maintain files, such as hazardous waste databases, chemical usage data, personnel exposure information, or diagrams showing equipment locations.
  • Calculate amount of pollutant in samples or compute air pollution or gas flow in industrial processes, using chemical and mathematical formulas.

Salary & Job Openings

Steps to Get There: Becoming an Environmental Science and Protection Technician

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