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Energy Engineer

Overview and Key Facts

engineers
Education
Education
Bachelor's degree
Median Pay
Median Pay
$100,640
Job Growth
Job Growth
0.00%
(Below US Average)
Jobs in 2031
Jobs in 2031
168,600

What Do They Do?

An energy efficiency engineer could...

Overview Listen to this section

How much energy do you think all the houses and buildings in the United States consume? It turns out they eat up 40% of all the energy that the U.S. uses in a year. The figure is high because all those houses and buildings need to be heated, cooled, lit, ventilated, and supplied with heated water and electricity to run all sorts of electrical devices, appliances, and computers. Energy efficiency engineers help reduce the energy that houses and buildings use. This saves families and businesses money, and lowers the emissions of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.

Do You Have the Skills and Characteristics of an Energy Engineer?


  1. Reading Comprehension: ?
  2. Critical Thinking: ?
  3. Writing: ?
  4. Systems Analysis: ?
  5. Active Listening: ?

Core Tasks

Think about if you'd like the typical tasks an Energy Engineer might do:
  • Identify and recommend energy savings strategies to achieve more energy-efficient operation.
  • Conduct energy audits to evaluate energy use and to identify conservation and cost reduction measures.
  • Monitor and analyze energy consumption.
  • Monitor energy related design or construction issues, such as energy engineering, energy management, or sustainable design.
  • Inspect or monitor energy systems, including heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) or daylighting systems to determine energy use or potential energy savings.
  • Advise clients or colleagues on topics such as climate control systems, energy modeling, data logging, sustainable design, or energy auditing.
  • Analyze, interpret, or create graphical representations of energy data, using engineering software.
  • Collect data for energy conservation analyses, using jobsite observation, field inspections, or sub-metering.
  • Verify energy bills and meter readings.
  • Manage the development, design, or construction of energy conservation projects to ensure acceptability of budgets and time lines, conformance to federal and state laws, or adherence to approved specifications.
  • Perform energy modeling, measurement, verification, commissioning, or retro-commissioning.
  • Review architectural, mechanical, or electrical plans or specifications to evaluate energy efficiency.
  • Prepare energy-related project reports or related documentation.
  • Review or negotiate energy purchase agreements.
  • Train personnel or clients on topics such as energy management.
  • Direct the implementation of energy management projects.
  • Research renewable or alternative energy systems or technologies, such as solar thermal or photovoltaic energy.
  • Promote awareness or use of alternative or renewable energy sources.
  • Write or install energy management routines for building automation systems.
  • Recommend best fuel for specific sites or circumstances.

Salary & Job Openings

Steps to Get There: Becoming an Energy Engineer

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